Paw Patrol not cancelled, though TV police dogs are becoming scarce

Paw Patrol is not canceled, though TV police dogs are becoming scarce.

Yesterday (Friday, July 24), during a White House press conference, Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany claimed that the Canadian Nickelodeon series Paw Patrol had been canceled as part of the wave of cop shows being canceled or significantly altered. And it is true that TV police dogs are caught up in this as well.

While speaking about President Donald Trump’s response to the anti-police sentiments gaining ground over the past few months, McEnany said, “We saw a few weeks ago that Paw Patrol, a cartoon show about cops, was canceled.”

However, Paw Patrol has not been canceled, a fact check by CNN reports. Nick Jr weighed on on Twitter to clarify the issue as well.

Cops was canceled, as was A&E’s Live PD, meaning that TV police dogs will become a lot more rare. This is a shame, as their presence educated the public on what K9 officers did, though the concept and shooting method of these shows can rightfully be criticized.

(The Live PD spinoff athletic competition America’s Top Dog will likely not receive a second season, though no details on this have been confirmed.)

And while LEGO has stopped marketing police sets for the time being, they are still being produced, refuting another of McEnany’s claims.

Paw Patrol is a Nick Jr series following a boy named Ryder and a pack of dogs, who are led by a German Shepherd police dog named Chase. It’s essentially Rescue Heroes with canines, as other dogs featured include Marshall the firefighting Dalmatian and Rubble the Bulldog, who works in construction.

It is produced by Spin Master Entertainment with animation done by Guru Studio, and is similar to the earlier Qubo series Turbo Dogs, which also stars anthropomorphic canines in a world of animals, starring race car drivers instead of first responders.

In late May and early June there was an outcry on social media for Paw Patrol to be canceled, which mom Amanda Bruce rolls her eyes at. “People are crazy,” she laughed.

Bruce has four kids who are obsessed with the show, and while Dog O’Day staff have watched a bit of several episodes here and there, finding them nearly unwatchable, the main audience they’re targeting is around 3-6 years old, so that’s a job well done.

Next: Here's why you should watch Quibi's Barkitechture

For more news and updates on cop shows and crime dramas on TV, check out our FanSided Network sister site Precinct TV.

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