Valet Living suggests which supplies to have on hand for a new puppy and one not to rely on

Valet Living is helping us put together the perfect list of supplies for our new puppy. But there is one common item they recommend keeping off the list. Can you guess what that item is? (You’ll have to keep reading to find out.)

Area Supervisor for Valet Living, Tricia Nguyen, shared some of her supplies dos and don’ts for what you may need to have on hand when bringing home a new puppy. And while we might immediately think of things like food and beds, there is so much more to bringing home a puppy than the usual supplies.

While bringing home a puppy is an exciting time, it is one we need to really be prepared for. And luckily for us Valet Living is here to help guide us in the right direction.

Valet Living offers up a list of things we should have on hand when bringing home a new puppy

So what does Nguyen think we need to have on hand? And what does she suggest we avoid? Check out the list below:

  • Crates – Using a crate is good for handling separation anxiety, as well as avoiding potentially dangerous or hazardous situations when you need to leave the home.
  • Dog toys – It’s important to keep your pup busy and active to keep them healthy and also to avoid them wreaking havoc.
  • Training Treats – Dog treats are always a good thing to have on hand anyway, but when training your pup, treats are a great reward that will enforce positive habits.
  • A leash – According to Tricia Nguyen, you want to have a very high quality leash, and her suggestion is to get a bungee leash.
  • A microchip – Having your puppy microchipped is a good way to keep track of them if they get out. It can mean the difference between your puppy coming home or being lost forever.

Finally, there is one item that Nguyen does not recommend new puppy parents add to their supplies list. And that item is the training pads.

While many new owners reach for the puppy pads to avoid indoor messes, puppies may actually get confused if taught to use pads indoors first. As long as they’ve got a safe place to go outside – you should avoid dog parks and boarding facilities before they’ve completed their initial vaccinations – it’s actually best to forego the puppy pad and potty train outside from the get-go.

What do you think of this supplies list? Are these items you would have thought of on your own? What do you think of the one item Valet Living recommends avoiding? Tell us in the comments below.